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Profile: Professor’s Art is Featured Locally

 

Photo by Mitchell Quartz

Eric Brown is a professor of art at SUU. He has won multiple awards and has had his work displayed in a variety of exhibitions: 17 of his works are currently being shown at the Cedar City Council Chambers.

Brown’s admiration and enjoyment of fine art can be traced back to his childhood and to an artist by the name of Jimmy Jones. He fondly recalls that his parents had commissioned Jimmy Jones to do a painting of his sister.

“I remember being really smitten by that whole thing,” he said. “That sparked and increased my interest in art.”

The medium of art that Brown prefers has changed with time and experience. His works consist of all manner of tools from conte crayons to watercolors, and more recently pastels.

Classrooms and art studios weren’t always his place of work. Before settling into the current career of teacher and artist, Brown worked in a manual labor vocation. During his teenage years, his grandfather, who was a contractor, employed him and taught him how to build. Later in life, Brown owned a cabinet shop here in Cedar City. He said that job was “sort of a default thing,” but that those past experiences were helpful in his art today.

“…you have to make a lot of judgment calls in cabinet making, which is what you’re doing all the time when drawing,” he said.

Learning to practice the virtues of patience and hard work in a competitive market place is also something that Brown says he was able to work on and hone during his time spent working at these jobs.

Brown doesn’t have a favorite piece of his own art. He is always looking forward towards what will catch his interest next. The subject, what or who will he see and through what medium will he make them immortal in art.

“…it’s the next one,” he says, “My next work is always the best one.”

Like every artist, Brown strives to make his work perfect. It’s the idea of perfection that draws the artist in, more so than finding that perfection by falling in love with the model.

“By the time you’ve sat in front of them and drawn them, trying to really capture their angles and colors and shapes, they always are beautiful.”

Anyone interested in seeing Professor Brown’s work should go to the Cedar City Council Chambers located at 10 N. Main Street. Admission to the exhibition is free and it is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is being shown until Oct. 27.

Story By
Carlee Jo Blumenthal
socialmedia@suunews.com

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